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Practical English 2510-p2ENG1S-PE
Ćwiczenia (CW) Semestr letni 2017/18

Informacje o zajęciach (wspólne dla wszystkich grup)

Liczba godzin: 50
Limit miejsc: (brak limitu)
Zaliczenie: Egzamin
Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

Grammar

Required reading:

Chazal, E. and Sam McCarter. 2012. Oxford. A course in English for Academic Purposes. Oxford University Press.

Dellar, Hand and A. Walkley. 2012. Outcomes. Advanced. Cengage Learning.

Foley, Michael D. Hall. 2012. ​My grammar lab advanced C1/C2. Longman.

Swan, Michael and D. Baker. 2008. ​Grammar scan: diagnostic tests for practical English usage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Additional reading:

Evans, Virginia. 2002. CPE Use of English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hewings, Michael. 2005. ​Advanced grammar in use. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Vince, Michael. 2010. ​Grammar scan: diagnostic tests for practical English usage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Reading and Vocabulary

Required reading:

Dellar, H and A. Walkley. 2012. Outcomes. Advanced. Student’s Book. Cengage Learning.

Nuttall, C. and A. French. 2012. Outcomes. Advanced. Workbook. Cengage Learning.

Gude, Kathy and Michael Duckworth. 2002. Proficiency Masterclass. Student's Book. Oxford.

Additional reading:

Chazal, E. and Sam McCarter. 2012. Oxford. A course in English for Academic Purposes. Oxford University Press.

Academic Writing

Anker, S. 2009. Real Writing with Readings: Paragraphs and Essays for College, Work, and Everyday Life, Fifth Edition Edition

Dellar, H and A. Walkley. 2012. Outcomes. Advanced. Student’s Book. Cengage Learning.

Gude, Kathy and Michael Duckworth. 2002. Proficiency Masterclass. Student's Book. Oxford.

Heffernan, J. A.W. and John E. Lincoln, 2000, Writing: A College Handbook.

Zemach, D. E and Lisa A. Rumisek. 2006. Academic Writing from Paragraph to Essay.

Translation

Required reading:

Belczyk, A. 2002. Poradnik tłumacza: z angielskiego na nasze.Wydawnictwo Idea. Kraków.

Bogudziński, J. Buczkowski, K. Kaznowski, A. 2004. ​Wzory umów i pism. Kompendium of Legal Templates. Wydawnictwo C.H. Beck. Warszawa.

Dzierżanowska, H. 1998. Przekład tekstów nieliterackich na przykładzie języka angielskiego. PWN. Warszawa.

Kierzkowska, Danuta (red.). 1998.​ Dokumenty polskie. Wybór dla tłumaczy sądowych. Wydawnictwo TEPIS. Warszawa.

Kierzkowska, Danuta (red.). 1998. Selection of English Documents. Wydawnictwo TEPIS. Warszawa.

Mayoral Asensio, R. 2003. Translating Official Documents. St Jerome Publishing.

Additional reading:

Chazal, E., McCarter. S. 2012. Oxford. A course in English for Academic Purposes. Oxford University Press.

Hejwowski, K. 2004. Kognitywno-komunikacyjna teoria przekładu. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN. Warszawa.

Korzeniowska, A., Kuhiwczak, P. 1998. Successful Polish-English Translation: Tricks of the Trade. Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN. Warszawa.

Piotrowska, M.2003. Learning Translation-Learning the Impossible? A Course of Translation from English into Polish. Universitas. Kraków.

Laboratory

Required reading:

Chazal, E. and Sam McCarter. 2012. Oxford. A course in English for Academic Purposes. Oxford University Press.

Dellar, H and A. Walkley. 2012. Outcomes. Advanced. Student’s Book. Cengage Learning.

Gude, Kathy and Michael Duckworth. 2002. Proficiency Masterclass. Student's Book. Oxford.

Additional reading:

English language podcasts and other resources available on moodle course page, including: TED Talks, Moth, Stuff You Missed in History Class, etc

Efekty uczenia się: (tylko po angielsku)

As above

Metody i kryteria oceniania: (tylko po angielsku)

Grammar

− participation in class activities recorded in an assessment log (winter and summer semesters) - K1, K2

− in-class test (winter semester) -W1, W2

− final exam (summer semester) -W1, W2, U1, U4

Reading and Vocabulary

− mid-semester written test (winter and summer semesters) - W3, U2, U3

− vocabulary tasks on the Moodle platform (winter and summer semesters) - W3

− written end-of-term test (winter semester) - W3, U2, U3

− written examination test (summer semester) - W3, U2, U3, U4

Academic Writing

− in-class writing (winter and summer semesters) – U9, U11

− home assignment (winter and summer semesters) – U9, U10, K6

− writing end-of-term test (winter semester) – W7, U8, U11

− written examination (summer semester) – W7, U8, U11

Translation (winter and summer semesters):

− written translation assignments (including two translation projects per semester) – W9, W10, W11, W12, W13, U12, U13, U14, U15, U16, K7, K9, K10, K11

− in-class assignments – W9, W10, W11, W12, W13, U12, U13, U14, U15, U16, K7, K9, K10, K11

− in-class activity – U12, U13, U14, U15, U16, K7, K8, K9, K11

Laboratory (winter and summer semester):

— active participation in class and preparation for it - U6, K3, K4, K5

— presentations - U5, U6

— vocabulary tests - W5

— final oral test (recording) in the summer semester - W4, W5, W6, U5, U6, U7

Assessment criteria:

fail - 0-59%

satisfactory- 60 - 69 %

satisfactory plus- 70 - 75 %

good - 76 - 85 %

good plus- 86 - 90%

very good- 91 - 100%

Assessment criteria for language competence applied across all Practical English components:

Very good

Grammatical competence

Shows a very good control of a wide spectrum of simple and complex grammatical forms (see the detailed description for grammar course) in a correct and appropriate way in academic, formal and informal register

Mistakes are rather very rare, difficult to spot and mostly pertain only to nuances of grammar; can easily correct their own mistakes

Lexical competence

Uses a very wide spectrum of lexical repertoire (including idiomatic expressions, phrasal verbs, and collocations) to discuss familiar and unfamiliar topics, aligning it to academic, formal and informal context

Lexical mistakes are rather very rare and mostly pertain to nuances of lexical use and meaning; can easily correct their own mistakes

Spoken interaction

Expresses themselves fluently, easily and spontaneously with very little hesitation

Uses language easily for social, academic and professional purposes

Formulates ideas and opinions easily and appropriately

Interacts easily, relating contributions to those of other speakers

Presents clear and detailed description of complex subjects effectively, widening the scope of the interaction, rounding off with an appropriate conclusion

A conceptually difficult subject does not hinder a natural, smooth flow of language

There is very little obvious searching for expressions or avoidance strategies

Pronunciation is intelligible clear and elegant.

Coherence

Contribution is relevant and substantial; ideas are very well-structured and varied

Uses a wide spectrum of cohesive devices, organizational patterns and discourse markers

Good

Performance shows features of descriptors for grades 3 and 5

Satisfactory

Grammatical competence

Shows a good control of simple and acceptable control of more complex grammatical forms (see the detailed description for grammar course) in a correct and appropriate way in academic, formal and informal register

Mistakes are rare and pertain only to nuances of grammar

Lexical competence

Uses a sufficient spectrum of lexical repertoire (including occasional idiomatic expressions, phrasal verbs, and collocations) to discuss familiar and unfamiliar topics, aligning it to formal and informal context

Lexical mistakes are relatively rare and pertain mostly to nuances of lexical use and meaning

Gaps are readily overcome with circumlocution.

Spoken interaction

Expresses themselves fluently and spontaneously; hesitation is occasional, but the overall output is modest in terms of quantity.

Uses language for social, academic and

professional purposes

Formulates ideas and opinions appropriately

Initiates the interaction and responds to it, relating contributions to those of other speakers mostly when made to.

Presents clear description of complex subjects at an acceptable level effectively, maintaining the interaction, rounding off with an appropriate conclusion

Only a conceptually difficult subject can hinder a natural, smooth flow of language

Coherence

Contribution is relevant although predictable; ideas are very well-structured and sufficiently varied

Uses a wide spectrum of cohesive devices, organizational patterns and discourse markers

Fail

Peak performance shows features of level B2+ at most and includes errors from the category regarded as 'unacceptable' at the desired level.

The final PNJA grade is the average of the results of all five components of the module.

The final test/presentation in every Practical English module is administered to determine the extent to which students have met the assumed learning outcomes and it values 50% of the final grade. A passing score must be obtained on the final test to pass each component. Students who have failed the test are allowed one retake, which in case of the final test is administered in the retake examination session.

The students are evaluated in accordance with the university regulations, and they must attend all course meetings. Each class absence has to be excused in the first week after the lesson missed. The final grade percentage will be reduced by 10% for every unexcused absence. Instructors are authorized to refuse credit when the student’s absenteeism rate is around 50%. Timely completion of assigned tasks is obligatory. In the case of assignments submitted after the deadline or re-submitted, the grade is lowered by 10%.

Zakres tematów: (tylko po angielsku)

Practical English course is a block of classes consisting of 5 courses: Academic Writing, Grammar, Reading and Vocabulary, Translation and Laboratory (listening and speaking).

Grammar

The aim of the course is to discuss various aspects of the English grammar at an advanced level, in particular: past tenses, future structures, and the passive voice.

Content distribution (winter semester)

− Diagnostic test

− Tenses

− Passive voice, causatives

− Conditionals, subjunctive

Content distribution (summer semester):

− Modal verbs

− Coordination

− Prepositions in noun phrases, verbs/adjectives + prepositions

Reading and Vocabulary

This component aim at developing techniques improving the deep-level comprehension of analysed academic texts. Another aim is to expand advanced vocabulary.

Content distribution (Winter semester)

− Introduction (presentation of learning outcomes, content of the course, evaluation methods and criteria, code of conduct)

− Medicine: sickness and health

− Safety, danger, risk

− Business and economics

− Fashion

− Evaluation

Content distribution (Summer semester)

− Introduction (presentation of learning outcomes, content of the course, evaluation methods and criteria, code of conduct)

− The media and the message (language in the news)

− Words speak volumes (the tree of language)

- Travelling: it broadens the mind

− Politics (taking liberties)

- Evaluation

Academic Writing

The goal for the course is to familiarize with the structure of a paragraph/essay (topic sentence, body, making a point), academic register as well as composing complex sentences that follow logic (proper reasoning). Upon completion, ability to compose well-structured, coherent academic texts is expected.

Content distribution (winter semester):

− paragraph structure

− academic register

− reasoning

Content distribution (summer semester):

− essay structure

− coherence, academic register

− argumentation

Translation

The aim of the course is to develop practical translation skills, raise awareness of translation problems and solve them using appropriate translation strategies, techniques and tools.

Content distribution (winter semester):

- tourism-related texts (leaflets, brochures, guides),

- medical texts,

- literary translation.

Content distribution (summer semester):

- instruction manuals,

- business texts (advertisements, company profiles, agreements),

- legal texts (job contracts, BMD certificates).

During the course, students will:

− produce translations of a variety of literary and technical texts

(tourism, instruction manuals, poems, prose, agreements, etc.),

− review and correct translations into Polish,

− review and correct translations into English,

− use translation techniques applicable for a given text type and audience,

− recognize and correctly render culture-specific elements,

− apply target language conventions where necessary with formatting, proper names, measurements, and address forms.

Laboratory

The aim is to integrate the listening comprehension of advanced authentic texts on intellectually stimulating topics (incl. popular science) representing various formats (dialogs, reports, debate, and academic lectures) with the development of speaking skills (inc. oral reproduction and discussion). The materials will be based on C1+ level coursebooks and American podcasts, analysed for their grammatical, lexical, and discourse, as well as content, and C1+ practice tests.

Content distribution (winter semester):

Advances in modern medicine (students’ choice plus Masterclass:1 sickness and health)

Psychology and behavior (students’ choice plus Chazal 1: using navigational language, signposting, checking, clarifying and confirming)

Storytelling (danger and risk) (The Moth: students’ choice plus Masterclass: 3 safety and danger)

Sustainability: (Chazal 5: signposting cont, introducing, contributing, interrupting and turn-taking)

Content distribution (summer semester):

Current affairs (students’ choice) − functions: asking for clarification; backtracking, interjections; summarizing and discussing issues)

Data (Chazal 7) (evidence vs. evaluation, critical evaluation; signposting cont.)CREATIVITY (establishing key words and themes; summarizing ideas from written sources) (coursebook)

History

Politics: (Masterclass 10, taking liberties) (political radicalism, challenges to democracy)

Metody dydaktyczne: (tylko po angielsku)

Expository teaching methods:

- description

- discussion

- participatory lecture

- problem-based lecture

Exploratory teaching methods:

- brainstorming

- case study

- classic problem-solving

- laboratory

- practical

- presentation of a paper

- project work

- seminar

Grupy zajęciowe

zobacz na planie zajęć

Grupa Termin(y) Prowadzący Miejsca Akcje
1 (brak danych), (sala nieznana)
Tomasz Fojt, Magdalena Kopczyńska, Krzysztof Strzemeski, Katarzyna Piątkowska, John Conniffe 10/ szczegóły
2 (brak danych), (sala nieznana)
Tomasz Fojt, Magdalena Kopczyńska, Krzysztof Strzemeski, Katarzyna Piątkowska, John Conniffe 11/ szczegóły
Wszystkie zajęcia odbywają się w budynku:
Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu.