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Sociology of Gender and Sexualities

Informacje ogólne

Kod przedmiotu: 2400-OG-EN-SGS-1 Kod Erasmus / ISCED: 14.2 / (0314) Socjologia i kulturoznawstwo
Nazwa przedmiotu: Sociology of Gender and Sexualities
Jednostka: Wydział Filozofii i Nauk Społecznych
Grupy: Zajęcia ogólnouniwersyteckie w j. obcym na WFiNS
Punkty ECTS i inne: 4.00
Język prowadzenia: angielski
Wymagania wstępne:

(tylko po angielsku) Communicative English (B2 or higher)

Rodzaj przedmiotu:

przedmiot fakultatywny

Całkowity nakład pracy studenta:

(tylko po angielsku) 100 hours (4 ECTS)

Efekty uczenia się - wiedza:

(tylko po angielsku) A student knows the basic theoretical perspectives about human sexuality and gender (especially women studies, gender studies, lesbian and gay studies, queer studies). He/she differentiates between sex, gender, gender identity, sex characteristics and psychosexual orientation. He/she recognizes the most important anthropological and sociological, Polish and foreign theorists and researchers in the field. He/she understand why and how sociological perspective is different from other perspectives. He/she connects gender and sexuality theories with the most important sociological theories.

Efekty uczenia się - umiejętności:

(tylko po angielsku) A student can find and interpret quantitative and qualitative data about gender and sexuality in different countries. He/she can interpret data regarding to gender and sexuality presented in media critically. A student can use his/her knowledge to implement changes in his/her school/university/work environment.

Efekty uczenia się - kompetencje społeczne:

(tylko po angielsku) A student can use and explain the advantages and disadvantages of using so called empathetic language. A student can manage social conflicts at work, understanding the idea of diversity management.

Metody dydaktyczne:

(tylko po angielsku) Discussions, reading texts, presentations, working on qualitative and quantitative data

Skrócony opis: (tylko po angielsku)

What is gender? What is the difference between sex and gender? How are they related with sexuality? With power, economy, democracy? These are the questions we will try to answer during the seminar. Most important gender and sexuality theories, reports and primary data will be presented by the coordinator and discussed with students.

The seminar will present basic theoretical perspectives about human sexuality and gender (especially women studies, gender studies, gay and lesbian studies, queer studies). The most important anthropological and sociological, Polish and foreign theorists and researchers in the field will be discussed. The importance and uniqueness of sociological perspective will be clarified. Gender and sexuality theories will be set out also in a broader perspective of the most important sociological theories.

Praktyki zawodowe:

None

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2017/18" (zakończony)

Okres: 2017-10-01 - 2018-02-25
Wybrany podział planu:


powiększ
zobacz plan zajęć
Typ zajęć: Konwersatorium, 20 godzin, 25 miejsc więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Beata Bielska
Prowadzący grup: Beata Bielska
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Konwersatorium - Zaliczenie na ocenę

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2018/19" (zakończony)

Okres: 2018-10-01 - 2019-02-24
Wybrany podział planu:


powiększ
zobacz plan zajęć
Typ zajęć: Konwersatorium, 20 godzin więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Beata Bielska
Prowadzący grup: Beata Bielska
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Konwersatorium - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Pełny opis: (tylko po angielsku)

1. Organisational classes. Description of the course schedule, comments, questions.

2. Introduction: sexuality, psychosexual orientation, sex and gender, gender identity, gender expression, sex characteristics. Biological essentialism vs. social constructivism.

Text: Vance 2007: 39-43.

3. Anthropological studies about gender and sexuality. Third sex. Sexual taboo. Mono/polygamy. Institutionalized homosexuality.

Text: Creed 1984: 172-175.

4. Women studies, gender studies. Women liberation and feminist movements. Feminisms.

Text: Vernet, Butera 2005: 175-181.

5. Reproduction vs. pleasure. Reproductive rights as human rights. Moral panic. Pro-abortion and anti-abortion social movements. Men’s movements, men studies. Backlash.

Text: Flood 1998: 62-71.

6. Gay and lesbian studies and queer theory. Gay liberation, queer and LGBT* social movements. Lesbians, gay men, bisexual, trans*, non-binary, intersex, asexual people. Heteronormativity.

Text: Binnie, Klesse 2012: 444-459.

7. Sexuality-body-health. Medical classifications. “Normal” and “not normal”. Body positivity. Fat studies.

Text: Ogden, Clementi 2010: 9 pages.

8. Sexuality and gender and market. Sexual work. Pink washing. Diversity management. Sexual capital.

Text: Puar 2013: 336-339.

9. Intersectionality: sex, gender, sexuality and - ethnicity, age, disabilities, class/socio-economic status, rural areas vs. cities, language, religion/denomination etc.

Text: Crenshaw 1989: 139-143.

10. Summary. Movie.

Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

Bacon, Linda; Aphramor, Lucy. 2011. Weight Science: Evaluating the Evidence for a Paradigm Shift, “Nutrition Journal”, vol. 10, no. 9, available: https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-10-9 [11.10.2018].

Binnie, Jon. 2014. Neoliberalism, Class, Gender and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Politics in Poland, “International Journal of Politics, Culture & Society”, no. 27, p. 241–257, DOI: 10.1007/s10767-013-9153-8.

Binnie, Jon; Klesse, Christian. 2012. Solidarities and tensions: Feminism and transnational LGBTQ politics in Poland, “European Journal of Women's Studies”, vol. 19, no. 4, p. 444-459.

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1986. Forms of capital, in: Richardson, John G. (red.). Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education, Westport, CT: Greenwood, p. 241–258.

Brewis, Alexandra A. 2011. Obesity. Cultural and Biocultural Perspectives, New Brunswick, New Jersey and London: Rutgers University Press (available online at the Main Library of Nicolaus Copernicus University from “Multiwyszukiwarka”, Adobe Digital Editions must be installed).

Butler, Judith. 1999. Gender trouble: feminism and the subversion of identity, New York; London: Routledge.

Carroll, Aengus; Mendos, Luca Ramón. 2017. State-Sponsored Homophobia. A World Survey Of Sexual Orientation Laws: Criminalisation, Protection And Recognition, available: http://ilga.org/what-we-do/state-sponsored-homophobia-report/ [20.09.2017].

Center for Reproductive Rights. 2018. The World’s Abortion Law, available: http://worldabortionlaws.com/map/ [11.10.2018].

Clark, Anna (ed.) 2011. The History of Sexuality in Europe. A sourcebook and reader, London and New York: Routledge.

Connell, R. W. 2004. Masculinities, Relations Among, in: Kimmel, Michael; Aronson, Amy. Men and Masculinities. A Social, Cultural, and Historical Encyclopaedia (eds.), p. 507-510.

Connell, R. W. 2005. Masculinities, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Connell, Raewyn; Pearse, Rebecca. 2015. Gender: In World Perspective, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Constitution of the Republic of South Africa no. 108 of 1996, available: http://www.gov.za/sites/www.gov.za/files/images/a108-96.pdf [19.06.2016].

Conwill, William Louis. 2010. Domestic Violence Among the Black Poor: Intersectionality and Social Justice, “International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling”, vol. 32, issue 1, p. 31–45.

Creed, Gerald W. 1984. Sexual Subordination: Institutionalized Homosexuality and Social Control in Melanesia, “Ethnology”, vol. 23, no. 3, p. 157-176, available: http://williamapercy.com/wiki/images/Sexual_Subordination.pdf [19.06.2016].

Crenshaw, Kimberly. 1989. Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics, “The University of Chicago Legal Forum”, issue 1, p. 139-143.

Currie, Ashley. 2010. The Strategy of Normalization in the South African LGBT Movement, “Mobilization: An International Quarterly”, vol. 15, no. 1, p. 45-62.

Epstein, Steven. 1997. Activism, Drug Regulation, and the Politics of Therapeutic Evaluation in the AIDS Era: A Case Study of DDC and the ‘Surrogate Markers’ Debate, “Social Studies of Science”, vol. 27, p. 691-726.

Faludi, Susan. 2006. Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women, New York: Three Rivers Press.

Feinberg, Jessica R. 2013. Avoiding Marriage Tunnel Vision, “Tulane Law Review”, vol. 88, no. 2, p. 257-315, available: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2247552 [19.06.2016].

Flood, Michael. 1998. Men’s Movements, “Community Quarterly”, issue 46, p. 62-71, available: https://mensmovement.com/mens-movements/ [11.10.2018].

Freedman, Jane. 2001. Concepts in the Social Sciences: Feminism, Buckingham and Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Foucault, Michel. The History of Sexuality, vol. 1: An Introduction, vol. 2: The Use of Pleasure, vol. 3: The Care of the Self (any edition).

Hildebrandt, Timothy. 2012. Development and Division: the effect of transnational linkages and local politics on LGBT activism in China, “Journal of Contemporary China”, no. 21, p. 845-862.

Holzhacker, Ronald. 2012. National and Transnational Strategies of LGBT Civil Society Organizations in Different Political Environments: Modes of Interaction in Western and Eastern Europe for Equality, “Comparative European Politics”, vol. 10, no. 1, p. 23-47.

Hovorka, Alice J. 2012. Women/chickens vs. men/cattle: Insights on gender–species intersectionality, “Geoforum”, vol. 43, issue 4, p. 875-884.

Hurtado, Aída; Sinha, Mrinal. 2008. More than men: Latino feminist masculinities and intersectionality, “Sex Roles”, vol. 59, issue 5-6, p. 337-349.

ILGA-Europe. 2016. Annual Review of the Human Rights Situation of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex People in Europe, available: https://rainbow-europe.org/ [13.02.2017].

Kollman, Kelly; Waites, Matthew. 2009. The global politics of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender human rights: an introduction, “Contemporary Politics”, vol. 15, no. 1, p. 1-17.

Kretschmer, Kelsy; Barber, Kristen. 2016. Men at the March. Feminist Movement Boundaries and Men's Participation in Take Back the Night and Slutwalk, “Mobilization: An International Quarterly”, issue 3, p. 283-300.

Kulpa, Robert; Mizielińska, Joanna. 2011. De-centring western sexualities. Central and Eastern European Perspectives, Burlington: Ashgate.

Kulpa, Robert. 2013. Nation Queer? Discourses Of Nationhood And Homosexuality In Times Of Transformation: Case Studies From Poland, available: https://www.academia.edu/2268846/Nation_Queer_Discourses_of_Nationhood_and_Homosexuality_in_Times_of_Transformation_Case_Studies_from_Poland [19.06.2016].

Lalonde, Richard N.; Silverman, Randy A. 1994. Behavioral preferences in response to social injustice: The effects of group permeability and social identity salience, “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, vol. 66, issue 1, p. 78-85.

Lubitow, Amy; Davis, Mia. 2011. Pastel Injustice: The Corporate Use of Pinkwashing for Profit, “Environmental Justice”, vol. 4, no. 2, p. 139-144, DOI: 10.1089/env.2010.0026.

Martin, Susan E. 1994. “Outsider within” the station house: The impact of race and gender on Black women police, “Social Problems”, vol. 41, issue 3, p. 383-400.

McIntosh, Mary. 1968. The Homosexual Role, “Social Problems”, vol. 16, p. 182-192, available: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0037-7791%28196823%2916%3A2%3C182%3ATHR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-S [19.06.2016].

Müller, Klaus. 1995. Oral history interview with Teofil (Stefan) Kosinski, available: http://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn504848 [13.02.2017], transcript available there.

O’Dwyer, Conor. 2010. From Conditionality to Persuasion? Europeanization and the rights of Sexual Minorities in Post-Accesion Poland, “Journal of European Integration”, vol. 32, no. 3, p. 229–247.

Ogden, Jane; Clementi, Cecelia. 2010. The Experience of Being Obese and the Many Consequence of Stigma, “Journal of Obesity”, available: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobe/2010/429098/ [11.10.2018].

Plummer, Kenneth. 2001. The Square of Intimate Citizenship, ”Citizenship Studies”, vol. 5, no. 6, p. 237-255, access: https://kenplummer.com/publications/selected-writings-2/intimate-citizenship/ [13.02.2017].

Puar, Jasbir. 2013. Rethinking Homonationalism, „International Journal of Middle East Studies”, vol. 45, p. 336-339, DOI: 10.1017/S002074381300007X.

Puhl, Rebecca M.; Andreyeva, Tatiana; Brownell, Kelly D. 2008. Perceptions of weight discrimination: prevalence and comparison to race and gender discrimination in America, “Internationl Journal of Obesity”, issue 32, p. 992-1000.

Santos, Ana Cristina. 2013. Are We There Yet? Queer Sexual Encounters, Legal Recognition and Homonormativity, “Journal of Gender Studies”, vol. 22, no. 1, p. 64-64, DOI: 10.1080/09589236.2012.745682.

Santos, Ana Cristina. 2012. Social Movements and Sexual Citizenship in Southern Europe, Palgrave Macmillan.

Schilt, Kristen; Westbrook, Laurel. 2009. Doing Gender, Doing Heteronormativity. „Gender Normals“, Transgender People, and the Social Maintenance of Heterosexuality, “Gender and Society”, issue 4, vol. 23, p. 440-464.

Schulenberg, Shawn. 2012. The Construction and Enactment of Same-Sex Marriage in Argentina, “Journal of Human Rights”, vol. 11, p. 106–125.

Seidman, Steven. 2014. The Social Construction of Sexuality, W. W. Norton & Company.

Smith, Sharon. 2013. Black feminism and intersectionality, “International Socialist Review”, vol. 91, available: https://isreview.org/issue/91/black-feminism-and-intersectionality [11.10.2018].

Takács, Judit. 2004. The Double Life of Kertbeny, in: Hekma, Gert (ed.) Past and Present of Radical Sexual Politics, Amsterdam: UvA – Mosse Foundation, p. 26–40, available: http://www.policy.hu/takacs/pdf-lib/TheDoubleLifeOfKertbeny.pdf [19.06.2016].

Takács, Judit; Szalma, Ivett. 2014. Gays in the Neighborhood? European Attitudes about Homosexuality a Quarter Century after the Fall of the Soviet Union, available: http://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/critcom/gays-in-the-neighborhood-european-attitudes-about-homosexuality-a-quarter-century-after-the-fall-of-the-soviet-union/ [13.02.2017].

Turner, Jonathan H. 2002. The Structure of Sociological Theory, Wadsworth Publishing.

Yamamoto, Matori. 2001. The Anthropological Study of Gender and Sexuality in Japan, “Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology”, vol.2, p. 105-137, DOI: 10.14890/jrca.2.0_105.

Vance, Carole S. 2007. Anthropology Rediscovers Sexuality: A Theoretical Comment, in: Parker, Richard; Aggleton, Peter (eds.),. Culture, Society and Sexuality. A Reader, London and New York: Routledge, p. 39-58.

Vernet, Jean-Pierre; Butera, Fabrizio. 2005. Women, women's rights and feminist movements, “Social Science Information”, issue 1, p. 175-181.

Warner, David F.; Brown, Tyson H. 2011. Understanding how race/ethnicity and gender define age-trajectories of disability: an intersectionality approach, “Social Science and Medicine”, vol. 72, issue 8, p. 1236-1248, DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.02.034.

Wassenberg, Anya. 2016. Orlando, the Stonewall Riots and the History of Attacks on Gay Nightclubs Illustrate the Intersectionality of Homophobia in America, available: http://www.inquisitr.com/3197176/orlando-stonewall-riots-attacks-gay-nightclubs-intersectionality-homophobia-america/ [19.06.2016].

WHO. (no date of publication). The International Classification of Diseases, access: http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/en/ [13.02.2017].

Wood, Julia T. 2008. The Rhetorical Shaping of Gender: Men’s Movements in America, in: (theirs) Gendered Lives: Communication, Gender, and Culture, p. 82-103, available from http://www.uky.edu/~addesa01/documents/GenderedLivesCh.4.pdf [11.10.2018].

Uwagi: (tylko po angielsku)

Rules – passing the course

During the course you should be present (1), active (2), read texts and write very short “two-questions” tests (3), prepare small workshops in groups (4).

1. PRESENCE. One point for every meeting.

2. ACTIVITY. One point for every meeting (easy to get during workshops). Classes 10 – you will be asked to write comments to the movie and send them by e-mail to me after classes.

3. TESTS. At the beginning of every meeting you will write a short test (2 questions). The test will include questions about and only about the text ascribed to the topic (“Text:…”). You will be allowed to use the text and your notes. Every test is worth 2 points. However, please notice it is not possible to answer the questions without understanding the text. You should read it carefully at home and try to understand it. It is also very useful to make notes. You should have texts with you (in print or on mobile devices) during classes.

4. WORKSHOPS. Students are most active from classes number 2 to classes number 9. You work in pairs or s. The task:

- you prepare the set of exercises (a workshop) for the whole group about the chosen topic,

- these exercises should take between 40 and 50 minutes,

- please remember that 1) you need time to explain the exercise and 2) divide people into groups, 3) they need time to understand the task and 4) to discuss it, 5) they need time to do the exercise, 6) you need time to check the answers and 7) summarize the exercise. 40-50 minutes is not a lot of time

- you should prepare at least 2 (longer) or at most 4 (shorter) exercises,

- exercises should present the topic of classes and make other students understand it,

- literature presented at the end of the course schedule must be used to prepare exercises; you should also use other scientific sources,

- there is a wide range of exercises that can be applied during classes: charades, a taboo game, a play, a drama, a story, a crossword, a speech, an experiment, the analysis of a text, a movie, a music video, pictures, photos, oxford debate, protest banners painting, dancing workshops – whatever you can imagine, use your imagination 

- each exercise must be of a different type,

- you may divide the whole group into small groups,

- you may work in the classroom or in the whole building, you may leave the building as well,

- the exercises may be loud, i.e. you may sing/scream – but not for too long 

Workshop - assessment criteria (47 points):

a) For the incentive – 2 points,

b) Number of exercises (between 2 and 4) – 2 points,

c) Time (40-50 minutes) - 3 points, too short or too long – 0 points,

d) Different types of exercises - 2 points,

e) Information presented: correctness – 5 points,

f) Types of exercises: originality/creativity - 5 points,

g) Content of exercises: originality/creativity - 5 points,

h) Exercises’ summary (.doc and .pdf) - 23 points

- all exercises should be listed and described in detail – 1 point,

- using footnotes in every description – 2 points,

- to the list of literature listed at the end of the course schedule – 1 point,

- at least one theoretical concept should be ascribed to each exercise - 7 points,

[e.g.. „exercise 1

• title of the exercise (e.g. drag queen/drag king performance)

• detailed description (goals of the exercise, the type of the exercise, detailed information about students’ tasks, results of the exercise)

• theoretical concept [e.g. gender performativity (Butler 1999: 55-60)] + definition of the concept],

- literature used must be scientific in at least 80% (scientific books, scientific articles, conference drafts, scientific documentaries, scientific reports, scientific public data – e.g. European Social Survey, professional encyclopedias – e.g. Encyclopedia of Sociology, scientific lectures available online – e.g. lecture on London School of Economics website). Wikipedia is not accepted. I strongly advise to use Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.pl/) and “Multiwyszukiwarka” (here: http://opac.bu.umk.pl/webpac-bin/B_horizonPL/wgbroker.exe?new+-access+top; left up corner, you should be logged on your NCU account) – 5 points,

- literature used should also contain all other non-scientific sources (e.g. movies from TEDx, Instagram photos, bills, prose fiction, press articles) – you should include all the sources you used – 1 point,

- you should use at least 6 sources – 2 points,

- at least 2 of them should come from the course schedule – 2 points,

- at least 3 of them should be other scientific sources - 2 points,

- at the end of the exercises’ summary you should inform how the group work was divided (e.g. Ana 30%, Tom 20%, Sasha 50%),

- exercises’ summary must be sent to the course instructor in .doc and .pdf max. on Thursday (3 pm.) before classes. Each day of being late – minus 5 points. I will check it and suggest changes. It will for sure give you extra points.

- exercises’ summary without literature – 0 points,

- you will get points individually if you work in pairs or groups; each person should speak. Do not be afraid of your English skills, our classes are for you (and me) to practice. You are allowed to use notes while speaking.

5. If you are absent during classes for which you should have prepared a workshop, you will not pass the course.

6. You are the authors of your presentations (exercises’ summaries). Please, remember you should prepare list of literature and footnotes (including sources of photos presented). If you cite or describe someone else’s work, please use footnotes. If you are not sure how to do it, write to me or visit my consultations.

7. Any kind of plagiarism (intentional or unintentional) will result in not passing the course. The dean of our faculty and the disciplinary commission of the University will also be informed.

Additional rules

8. Each person attending classes has the right to refuse taking part in an exercise. It does not have to be explained.

9. Consultations are for you. Visit me if you need any advice or you want to talk about your ideas. This is also the time for us to talk about your individual situation. I strongly encourage you to visit me a week before your workshop.

10. Interesting suggestions, insightful conclusions, groundbreaking ideas – all of them are kindly welcome and will be rewarded in points for active participation.

11. Be on time, please. If you are late more than 15 minutes, you will not get any points for attendance or active participation (but you may stay, of course).

12. It is ok to drink during classes, but, if your health does not require it, please do not eat.

13. Mobile phones should be in silent mode or switched off (no vibrations). Do not use your phones to check text messages and/or social media and/or dictionary. It is ok to check the obligatory text on the phone.

14. Every student has the right to be absent twice. It does not have to be explained or documented. You do not have to do anything. If you are absent three times or more, you will not pass the course.

Points – altogether 84 points:

1. Attendance – 1 point for classes – max. 10 points (1 x 10 meetings)

2. Active participation – 0-1 point for classes – max. 9 points (1 x 9 meetings)

3. Tests – 0-2 points for classes – max. 18 points (2 x 9 meetings)

4. Workshop – 0-47 points.

0-49 points – D (2)

50-58 points – C (3)

59-63 points – C+ (3,5)

64-67 points – B (4)

68-71 points – B+ (4,5)

72-84 points – A (5)

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2019/20" (zakończony)

Okres: 2019-10-01 - 2020-02-28
Wybrany podział planu:


powiększ
zobacz plan zajęć
Typ zajęć: Konwersatorium, 30 godzin więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Beata Bielska
Prowadzący grup: Beata Bielska
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Konwersatorium - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Pełny opis: (tylko po angielsku)

1. Lectures of Erasmus+ visiting professors: gender and gender education, feminization of migration.

2. Organisational classes. Description of the course schedule, comments, questions.

3. INTRODUCTION: sexuality, psychosexual orientation, sex and gender, gender identity, gender expression, sex characteristics. Biological essentialism vs. social constructivism.

Text: Vance 2007: 39-43.

4. ANTHROPOLOGY. Anthropological studies about gender and sexuality. Third sex. Sexual taboo. Mono/polygamy. Institutionalized homosexuality.

Text: Creed 1984: 172-175.

5. WOMEN. Women liberation and feminist movements. Feminisms. Women studies, gender studies.

Text: Vernet, Butera 2005: 175-181.

6. ANTI-GENDER. Pro-abortion and anti-abortion social movements. Moral panic. Men’s movements. Men studies.

Text: Flood 1998: 62-71.

7. LGBT+. Gay liberation, queer and LGBT+ social movements. Lesbians, gay men, bisexual, trans, non-binary, intersex, asexual people. Heteronormativity. Gay and lesbian studies and queer theory.

Text: Binnie, Klesse 2012: 444-459.

8. ECONOMY. Sexuality and gender and market. Sexual work. Pinkwashing. Diversity management. Sexual capital.

Text: Puar 2013: 336-339.

9. INTERSECTIONALITY: gender, sexuality and - ethnicity, age, size, disabilities, class/socio-economic status etc.

Text: Crenshaw 1989: 139-143.

10. Summary. Movie.

Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

Bacon, Linda; Aphramor, Lucy. 2011. Weight Science: Evaluating the Evidence for a Paradigm Shift, “Nutrition Journal”, vol. 10, no. 9, available: https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-10-9 [11.10.2018].

Bielska, Beata. 2019. “People join us when it’s bad”. Positive Mobilization Outcomes of Polish LGBT Movement in Disadvantageous Political Situation A paper presented at the ESA Sexuality Research Network (23) Midterm Conference "Sociological explorations of sexuality in Europe: bodies, practices, and resistance in troubled times" in February 14-15, 2019, Jagiellonian University, Cracow.

Binnie, Jon. 2014. Neoliberalism, Class, Gender and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Politics in Poland, “International Journal of Politics, Culture & Society”, no. 27, p. 241–257, DOI: 10.1007/s10767-013-9153-8.

Binnie, Jon; Klesse, Christian. 2012. Solidarities and tensions: Feminism and transnational LGBTQ politics in Poland, “European Journal of Women's Studies”, vol. 19, no. 4, p. 444-459.

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1986. Forms of capital, in: Richardson, John G. (red.). Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education, Westport, CT: Greenwood, p. 241–258.

Brewis, Alexandra A. 2011. Obesity. Cultural and Biocultural Perspectives, New Brunswick, New Jersey and London: Rutgers University Press (available online at the Main Library of Nicolaus Copernicus University from “Multiwyszukiwarka”, Adobe Digital Editions must be installed).

Butler, Judith. 1999. Gender trouble: feminism and the subversion of identity, New York; London: Routledge.

Carroll, Aengus; Mendos, Luca Ramón. 2017. State-Sponsored Homophobia. A World Survey Of Sexual Orientation Laws: Criminalisation, Protection And Recognition, available: http://ilga.org/what-we-do/state-sponsored-homophobia-report/ [20.09.2017].

Center for Reproductive Rights. 2018. The World’s Abortion Law, available: http://worldabortionlaws.com/map/ [11.10.2018].

Clark, Anna (ed.) 2011. The History of Sexuality in Europe. A sourcebook and reader, London and New York: Routledge.

Connell, R. W. 2004. Masculinities, Relations Among, in: Kimmel, Michael; Aronson, Amy. Men and Masculinities. A Social, Cultural, and Historical Encyclopaedia (eds.), p. 507-510.

Connell, R. W. 2005. Masculinities, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Connell, Raewyn; Pearse, Rebecca. 2015. Gender: In World Perspective, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Connell, R. W.; Messerschmidt, James W. 2005. Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept, “Gender and Society”, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 829-859.

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Uwagi: (tylko po angielsku)

Rules – passing the course

During the course you should be present (1), read texts and write very short “two-questions” tests (2), prepare small workshops in groups (3).

1. PRESENCE. Two points for every meeting.

2. TESTS. At the beginning of every meeting (classes 3-10) you will write a short test (2 questions). The test will include questions about and only about the text ascribed to the topic (“Text:…”). You will be allowed to use the text and your notes. Every test is worth 4 points. However, please notice it is not possible to answer questions without understanding the text. You should read it carefully at home and try to understand it. It is also very useful to make notes. You should have texts with you (printed ONLY, no mobile devices) during classes. Please remember you should write tests individually and have your own texts and notes.

3. WORKSHOPS. Students are most active from classes number 3 to classes number 9. You work in groups. The task:

- you prepare the set of exercises (a workshop) for the whole group about the chosen topic,

- these exercises should take between 40 and 50 minutes,

- please remember that 1) you need time to explain the exercise and 2) divide people into groups, 3) they need time to understand the task and 4) to discuss it, 5) they need time to do the exercise, 6) you need time to check the answers and 7) summarize the exercise. 40-50 minutes is not a lot of time

- you should prepare at least 2 (longer) or at most 4 (shorter) exercises,

- exercises should present the topic of classes and make other students understand it,

- literature presented at the end of the course schedule must be used to prepare exercises; you should also use other scientific sources,

- there is a wide range of exercises which can be applied during classes: charades, a taboo game, a play, a drama, a story, a crossword, a speech, an experiment, the analysis of a text, a movie, a music video, pictures, photos, oxford debate, protest banners painting, dancing workshops – whatever you can imagine, use your imagination 

- each exercise must be of a different type,

- you may divide the whole group into small groups,

- you may work in the classroom or in the whole building, you may leave the building as well,

- the exercises may be loud, i.e. you may sing/scream – but not for too long 

Workshop - assessment criteria (50 points):

a) For the incentive – 2 points,

b) Number of exercises (between 2 and 4) – 2 points,

c) Time (40-50 minutes) - 4 points, too short or too long – 0 points,

d) Different types of exercises - 2 points,

e) Information presented: correctness – 5 points,

f) Types of exercises: originality/creativity - 5 points,

g) Content of exercises: originality/creativity - 5 points,

h) Workshop’s summary (.doc and .pdf) – 25 points

Send me only ONE FILE with all information you want to present (.doc or similar). You do not have to use PowerPoint, but if you do, include all information in .doc file (photos and links too). It should have two parts:

FIRST PART - DESCRIPTION:

- all exercises should be listed and described in detail – 1 point,

- using references in every description – 2 points,

- to the list of literature (listed at the end of the course schedule) – 1 point,

- at least one theoretical concept should be ascribed to each exercise - 7 points,

[e.g. „exercise 1

• title of the exercise (e.g. drag queen/drag king performance)

• detailed description (goals of the exercise, the type of the exercise, detailed information about students’ tasks, results of the exercise)

• theoretical concept [e.g. gender performativity (Butler 1999: 55-60)] + definition of the concept + references],

SECOND PART – LITERATURE:

- literature used must be scientific in at least 80% (scientific books, scientific articles, conference drafts, scientific documentaries, scientific reports, scientific public data – e.g. European Social Survey, professional encyclopedias – e.g. Encyclopedia of Sociology, scientific lectures available online – e.g. lecture on London School of Economics website). Wikipedia is not accepted. I strongly advise to use Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.pl/) and “Multiwyszukiwarka” (here: http://opac.bu.umk.pl/webpac-bin/B_horizonPL/wgbroker.exe?new+-access+top; left up corner, you should be logged on your NCU account) – 5 points,

- literature used should also contain all other non-scientific sources (e.g. movies from TEDx, Instagram photos, bills, prose fiction, press articles) – you should include all the sources you used – 1 point,

- you should use at least 8 sources – 2 points,

- at least 3 of them should come from the course schedule – 2 points,

- at least 3 of them should be other scientific sources, found by you - 2 points,

- prepare the complete list of literature: all sources should be included – 1 point,

- order of the list of literature should be alphabetical – 1 point,

- exercises’ summary without literature – 0 points for the whole workshop.

At the end of the exercises’ summary you should inform how the group work was divided (e.g. Ana 30%, Tom 20%, Sasha 50%),

Exercises’ summary must be sent to the course instructor in .doc and .pdf max. on Monday (3 pm.) before classes. Each day of being late – minus 5 points. I will check it and suggest changes. It will for sure give you extra points.

You will get points individually; each person should speak. Do not be afraid of your English skills, our classes are for you (and me) to practice. You are allowed to use notes while speaking.

4. If you are absent during classes for which you should have prepared a workshop, you will not pass the course.

5. You are the authors of your presentations (workshop’s summaries). Please, remember you should prepare the list of literature and references (including sources of photos presented). If you cite or describe someone else’s work, please use references. If you are not sure how to do it, write to me or visit my consultations BEFORE the workshop.

6. Any kind of plagiarism (intentional or unintentional) will result in not passing the course. The dean of our faculty and the disciplinary commission of the University will also be informed. Cheating (copying) is also forbidden.

Additional rules

7. Each person attending classes has the right to refuse taking part in an exercise. It does not have to be explained.

8. Consultations are for you. Visit me if you need any advice or you want to talk about your ideas. This is also the time for us to talk about your individual situation. At least one person from the group should visit me at least a week before your workshop to talk about your ideas and plans.

9. Interesting suggestions, insightful conclusions, groundbreaking ideas – all of them are kindly welcome.

10. Be on time, please. If you are late more than 15 minutes, you will not get any points for attendance or active participation (but you may stay, of course).

11. It is ok to drink during classes, but, if your health does not require it, please do not eat.

12. Mobile phones should be in silent mode or switched off (no vibrations). Do not use your phones to check text messages and/or social media and/or dictionary. Do not use them during classes.

13. Every student has the right to be absent twice (when you are sick, for example). It does not have to be explained or documented. You do not have to do anything. If you are absent three times or more, you will not pass the course.

Points – altogether 102 points:

1. Attendance – 2 points for classes – max. 20 points (2 x 10 meetings)

2. Tests – 0-4 points for classes – max. 32 points (4 x 8 meetings)

3. Workshop – 0-50 points.

0-59% – D (2)

60-74% – C (3)

75-79% – C+ (3,5)

80-84% – B (4)

85-89% – B+ (4,5)

90-100% – A (5)

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2021/22" (jeszcze nie rozpoczęty)

Okres: 2021-10-01 - 2022-02-20
Wybrany podział planu:


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Typ zajęć: Konwersatorium, 30 godzin więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Beata Bielska
Prowadzący grup: Beata Bielska
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Konwersatorium - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu.